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Innovation Excellence Awards Year 2021 Pairfum Perfumery House 1 1

LiveWire Innovation & Excellence Awards 2021

We were delighted when we were nominated for the LiveWire Innovation & Excellence Awards 2021.

Today we are excited to announce that we have won the title of
Perfumery House of the Year

During the awards process, over 90,000 businesses and corporate professionals, magazine contributors and the subscribers of CorporateLiveWire.com nominated companies & individuals which they felt were deserving of recognition based on factors such as service, innovation, experience, sustainability and other key criteria.

 

Innovation Excellence Awards 2021 Pairfum Perfumery House Year 1 1

Pairfum London Pollinator Opposes Bee Killing Pesticides 1 1

Pollinators | We Oppose The Use Of Bee-Killing Pesticides

We oppose the UK Government’s decision to allow the use of neonicotinoid thiamethoxam, a pesticide known to kill pollinators and bees in particular.

Their use was effectively banned in 2018 after various studies demonstrated how they decimate the bee population. They also lead to a loss of birds due to a reduction in the insect populations.

Here are links to articles with more information on the subject:

Pairfum London Opposes Bee Killing Pesticides Pollinator 1 1

Why are Pollinators so important?

Here at Pairfum London, we are passionate about natural perfumery.

Without pollinators, there is, however, no movement of pollen.

A pollinator is anything that helps carry pollen from the male part of the flower (stamen) to the female part of the same or another flower (stigma). The movement of pollen must occur for a plant to become fertilized and produce fruits, seeds and young plants.

Without this fertilisation we cannot produce natural perfumes.

Pollinator Pairfum London Opposes Bee Killing Pesticides 1 1

What is the Impact of Pollinators?

A third of everything we eat exists because of the work a pollinators, such as fruits, vegetables and seeds. Pollinators also support the habitat and food of animals.

At least 75 percent of all the flowering plants on earth are pollinated by insects and animals! Plants which help to stabilize our soil, clean our air, supply oxygen and support wildlife. The health of our ecosystems depends on pollinators.

Just in the US, honey bees pollinated $19 billion worth of crops in 2010 and the pollination by other insects contributed to just under $10 billion of crops.

Pairfum London Opposes Pesticides Killing Bees Pollinator 1 1

 

 

Pairfum London Happy New Year Big Ben Fireworks 1 1

Happy New Year 2021

We would like to wish All of our customers, partners, friends and family a very Happy New Year 2021.

The New Year bring to an end the year 2020 that was difficult for all of us because of COVID, regardless of where or who we are.

May we all treasure the people and times that we have in lives together.

Much that we took for granted has become very precious.

This is why wishing you Happiness, Health and Prosperity in 2021 has a ‘ring’ to it, that is different to previous years.

Pairfum London Happy New Year Drinks 1 1

Pairfum London Firework Happy New Year Big Ben 1 1

Pairfum London Happy New Year Big Ben 1 1

Pairfum London Happy New Year Fireworks 1 1

Pairfum London Big Ben Firework Happy New Year 1 1

Merry Christmas 2020 Pairfum London Glass Champagne

Merry Christmas 2020

We would like to wish all of our Customers, Friends and Visitors a very Happy Christmas.

We very much hope that you will get a chance to spend some time with your families & friends in some form or another.

We know it will not be the same, as being able to hugg, kiss and talk in person but at least we can ensure that nobody feels alone.

It has been a very strange and difficult year for all of us, which is why feel very privileged to have been part of your life during this time.

Josephine & Huib

 

Santa's Sleigh Pairfum London Christmas Santa Coming Snow

At a time like this, wonderful memories are very precious.

With this in mind, below are links to the wonderful Christmas Concert by the 3 Tenors in Vienna 1999:

Full Concert: Christmas in Vienna 1999 The Three Tenors L.Pavarotti, J.Carreras, P.Domingo

“White Christmas” = White Christmas

“Sleigh Ride” = Sleigh Ride

“I’ll Be Home for Christmas” = I’ll Be Home for Christmas

 

Merry Christmas 2020 Pairfum London Santa Hats

PAIRFUM London Keep Calm And Let Christmas Sparkle luxury scented candles natural reed diffuser

Merry Christmas 2020 Pairfum London Santa Claus

Savanna Rae Review Perfume Experience Box Fragrance Library 1 Sq

Review of the Perfume Experience Box by Savanna Rae

Savanna Rae Review Perfume Experience Box Fragrance Library 9 Sq

We are delighted to share with you a wonderful review of our Perfume Experience Box (Fragrance Library) by Savanna Rae.

We really like how she describes the use of the Experience Box as a unique gift because gifting perfume is notoriously difficult.

You will enjoy reading the full review here on here website.

On our website, you can find the Perfume Experience Box on this page.

She also created a video review on YouTube:

Bluebell Wood Fragrance Pairfum London UK

The Perfume of the Bluebell Wood

Bluebell Wood Fragrance Pairfum London UK

We were truly enchanted when visiting a customer on the border of Hampshire and Wiltshire. They showed us their beautiful ‘Bluebell Wood’, just a small part of their magnificent garden.

The Perfume of the Woodland Bluebell filled the air and was only matched in majesty by the Birdsong.

Watch the video at the bottom of this article and listen carefully to the bird song.

The Bluebell Wood at its Best

The bluebells which do flower will produce even more perfume than usual this year. The reason for this is that flowers concentrate more energy on breeding during a dry period rather than on producing succulents. They will produce more nectar and therefore more scent in order to attract pollinating insects.

Bluebell Wood Fragrance Pairfum London UK

Bluebells are sometimes called ‘Common Bluebells’ but they are anything but common. This spectacular plant is only found in northern Europe, with Britain containing more than half of the world’s population.

The bluebells native to Britain are mostly referred to as ‘English bluebells’ but they are also known as Bell Bottle, Wood Hyacinth, Witches’ Thimbles, Lady’s Nightcap and Wood Bell.

They are a protected species in the UK and a woodland carpeted in masses of bluebells is one of the most magical and one of the greatest woodland spectacles you can see.

A bluebell wood in full bloom is a true delight for all your senses.

As you wander through a bluebell wood with dappled sunlight kissing the flowers and their scent wafting through the air, it is nature at its best. This is a quintessential British sight during the spring months. It lets us know that the days are getting longer, warmer and that Summer is on its way.

Bluebell Wood Perfume Pairfum London Home Fragrance

When Bluebells transform our woodland in springtime, the carpet of intense blue under the tree canopy stretching out into the distance is a scene full of delicate fragile flowers. A beautiful sight that once seen will remain with you for ever. It will come as no surprise that the British bluebell is one of the nation’s best-loved flowers.

Bluebells as a Protected Species

We are very fortunate in the UK because bluebells are relatively rare throughout the rest of the world and in fact the UK is home to over half of the bluebell colonies in the world. Therefore, it is very important that bluebells are well looked after.

English bluebells are so precious in fact that footfall damage can be devastating to a bluebell population. If a bluebell’s leaves are damaged or destroyed, they will be unable to photosynthesise which will unfortunately cause them to perish.

Their vulnerability is exacerbated by the fact it can take up to seven years for a colony of bluebells to become established and so any harm inflicted on a bluebell colony will have implications for many years to come.

Bluebell Wood Perfume Pairfum London Flower

We also need to take care in which species of bluebells we plant. It is important that we avoid planting Spanish bluebells, especially next to our much more delicate native English bluebells. This is because Spanish bluebells can be much more vigorous and dominate native English bluebells.

To ensure their survival, the UK government actually passed a law making the deliberate act of either destroying, uprooting, or picking bluebells a criminal offence.

(if you are interested in the differences between native English bluebells and Spanish bluebells, there is a small section at the bottom of this article where the characteristics of them both are discussed as well as their hybrids.)

Bluebell Wood Perfume Pairfum London Dappled Light

Bluebell Photography

Of course, such laws are not put in place to prevent anyone put from appreciating the beautiful woodland bluebell.

The National Trust actually encourages photography of bluebells and we would like to share some top tips when taking photographs of bluebells.

Bluebell Wood Perfume Pairfum London Forest Floor

The first tip would be to try to take your photographs just after midday from mid-April to mid-May. The approaching angle of sunlight at these specific times creates a greater proportion of blue wavelengths which enhances the iconic colour of bluebells. However, in the images throughout this article where the bluebells are against sun-dappled woodland floors the contrast had to be manipulated as the sunlight can create problems with the contrast.

The second tip would be to consider the angle of your images. We would recommend taking some images at the same level of the flower heads closer to the ground. For these types of images, you may want to use a camera, but a phone also works very well.

Bluebell Wood Scent Pairfum London Forest Floor

The third tip is more focused at photography enthusiasts. We recommend that should your camera allow it, always shoot in RAW mode. This is because the human eye absorbs colour differently to a camera lenses and you want to try and reflect being there in-person as much as possible. It is likely that if your camera enables to take RAW images, it will include the required software to post-process your images.

Now that we have discussed how to capture the visual beauty of a bluebell wood, how do we also harness the bluebell’s iconic scent?

Fragrance of Bluebell

How can we describe the fragrance of the Bluebells?

The olfactive profile of the Bluebell is reminiscent of the Hyacinth. It is not a very strong fragrance but it becomes very noticeable when walking through a Bluebell wood.

Bluebell Wood Scent Pairfum London Flower Bloom

We describe it a green-floral, as it is oily-green and quite intoxicating. Bluebells are not part of the ‘white flowers’ category (Jasmin, Orange Blossom, Tuberose, Ylang, Gardenia,…), not because of their colour but because they have a richness, headiness and depth that is more reminiscent ‘red flowers’ category (Rose, Violet, Lilac, Sweet Pea,…). Some perfumers believe there should be a ‘green floral’ category for flowers such as Lily of the Valley, Narcissus and Hyacinth. This is where we believe the most natural home for the Bluebell is.

In fragrance accords, Bluebell is not typically a dominant scent profile in a fragrance accord, even though many famous perfumes have been created in honour of this beautiful note:

  • Bluebell by Penhaligon’s
  • English Bluebell by Yardley
  • Wild Bluebell by Jo Malone

For Home Fragrances, we can highly recommend Pairfum London’s White Lavender which contains the beautifully green notes of Bluebell and Hyacinth. It is available in perfumed candles, reed diffusers and perfume room sprays in our online boutique.

Native Bluebell v Spanish Bluebell

How can you tell or spot the difference between a Native Bluebell and a Spanish Bluebell?

One of the ways that you can tell the difference between the Native and Spanish flower, is that in the Native Bluebell the pollen is white, whereas in Spanish Bluebells, the pollen is blue. In the hybrid Bluebell, a variety of characteristics are exhibited which are intermediate in form and a colour between both ‘Native Bluebell’ and ‘Spanish Bluebell’. In other words the hybrid Bluebell exhibits characteristics of both parent plants.

Their wonderful scent is said to have 35 components which attracts pollinating insects deep into the bluebell woods.

Some might say, they also attract passing walkers to sit down, take a welcome rest and enjoy nature in all its beauty …

Bluebells Woodland Sunlight Fragrance Pairfum London 7

Photo Gallery Bluebell Wood

Fragrance Magnificent Magnolias Windsor Park

Magnolias are some of the most primitive of our flowering trees

INSTAGRAM MAGNIFICENT MAGNOLIA

Magnolias are some of the most primitive of our flowering trees, known for their graceful, fragrant flowers they hail from a diverse genus of trees and shrubs.

They have been around for millennia with fossils dating back to the Tertiary period (they were around before our Friends the Bees arrived). They are just as at home in our Gardens and Parks, as they are in their natural forest habitat, and most of them are perfectly happy to adapt to city living.

INSTAGRAM MAJESTIC MAGNOLIAS

In warmer parts of the country some magnolias have been in bloom since February others bloom in March and appear to usher in the spring, while others are Happy to wait until as late as June to flower. Regardless of when they grace us with their stunning Flowers and fragrance, the Magnolia has become one of the most loved plants Worldwide.

INSTAGRAM MAGICAL MAGNOLIA

Their colours range from pure white to deepest purple, and they fill the spring air with an enchanting scent that makes you want to stop and stay a while.

In 1900 Louisiana declared the Magnolia as its state flower due to its abundance throughout the state, and also in 1900 school children in Mississippi held a state-wide election and voted the Magnolia to be their state flower.

So, … from the Rain forests of Asia, central Europe and from East to West coast of the USA, these exceptional plants are loved Worldwide.

However, historically there has been some confusion and debate as to what can actually be classed as a ‘Magnolia.

INSTAGRAM MARVELLOUS MAGNOLIA

Description of Magnolia

Typically, Magnolias are characterised as large bowl or star shaped fragrant flowers that spread in shrubs or evergreen and deciduous trees. They usually bloom in to either yellow, purple, green, pink or white flowers and their leaves usually appear afterwards in spring. In autumn, cone-shaped fruits are also produced.

Just like other Magnoliaceae, the perianth has at least 3 whorls each with 9-15 tepals. The bisexual flowers have several adnate carpels and on the elongated receptacle, the stamens are arranged in a spiral pattern. Along carpel’s dorsal sutures the fruit dehisces, and the pollen is monocolpate. Magnolias also have a Polygonum type of embryo development.

PINK SINGLE MAGNOLIA FLOWER

History of Magnolias

Early History

The first recorded use of the word ‘Magnolia’ was by General Charles Plumier in 1703 to describe a flowering tree found in Martinique. After Plumer, William Sherard, an English botanist who studied under Magnol, was next to use the term ‘Magnolia’. The first botanical literature since Plumier’s ‘Genera’ included ‘Hortus Elthamensis’ (written by Hohann Jacon Dillenius) and ‘Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands’ (written by Mark Catesby), both of which Sherard were responsible for. In these botanical literatures, the term ‘Magnolia’ was also used to describe some types of flowering trees that were found the North America where the climate was more temperate. In fact, a botanist called Lamarck later used the term ‘Annona dodecapetala’ to describe what Plumier first referred to as ‘Magnolia’ which is now recognised as ‘Magnolia dodecapetala’.

WHITE MAGNOLIA IN BLOOM ON A BRANCH

Carl Linnaeus, also used the genus name Mangnolia in ‘Systema Naturae’ (the first edition), written in 1735. Whilst there was no description references to Plumier’s work were made. Linnaeus again used Plumier’s ‘Magnolia’ where he describes a monotypic genus in 1753 in ‘Species Plantarum’ (first edtion) with ‘Magnolia virginia being the only species.

If there ever was a herbarium specimen from Plumier’s ‘Magnolia’, Linnaeus never saw it and is likely he assumed it was the same plant that Catesby described in ‘Natural History of Carolina (written in 1730. Linnaeus put it synonymous with ‘Magnolia virginia var’. Foetida is a type of taxon called ‘Magnolia grandiflora’. Linnaeus described five varieties of ‘Magnolia virginia’ (acuminate, foetida, grisea, glauca and tripetala). These 5 varieties were reduced to four after Linnaeus combined grisea with glauca in ‘Systema Naturae’ (10th edition, written in 1759) where he also raised the other four varieties to the status of species.

Botanists and plant explorers started to describe ‘Mangnolia’ species from China and Japan by the end of the 18th century whilst exploring Asia. The first species were described by western botanists as ‘Magnolia Lilifllora’ & ‘Magnolia Denudata’ and ‘Magnolia Coco’ & ‘Magnolia Figo’.

Not long after, Carl Peter Thunberg collected and described ‘Magnolia Obovata’ in Japan in 1974 and around the same time ‘Magnolia Kobus’ were collected for the first time.

WHITE MAGNOLIA FLOWER POLLEN

Recent History

Much later, as there was an increase in the number of species, it was decided that the genus was to be divided in to two subgenera, ‘Yulania’ and ‘Magnolia’. ‘Magnolia’ includes the horticulturally important ‘M. Grandiflora’ found in the USA and in particular the south-eastern states and the species type known as ‘M. Virginiana’.

‘Yulania’ includes many deciduous species from Asia including ‘M. Kobus’ and ‘M. Denudata’ which have their own horticultural importance and are also important as parents in hybrids.

The American deciduous Cucumber Tree (‘M. Acuminata’) is also classified as ‘Yulania’ and is the responsible for many new hybrids having yellow flowers meaning it has been given greater status.

For a long while, taxonomists have been puzzled by the relations throughout the ‘Magnoliaceae’ family. Since the Magnoliaceae has survived several huge geographical events (including continental drift, the formation of mountains and even ice ages), they have a vast scattered distribution. This has also led to the long-term isolation of some species or even groups of species as well as other species maintaining close contact.

It has proved impossible to solely use morphological characters to create divisions in the ‘Magnoliaceae’ family and even within the genus ‘Magnolia’.

PINK MAGNOLIA PETALS

Phylogenetic Era

Research on phylogenetic relationships was able to be conducted on a large scale at the end of the 20th century once DNA sequencing had finally become available. To investigate the relationships between the many species in the Magnoliaceae family, several studies were conducted. With the support of morphological data, all of the phylogenetic studies concluded that the genus ‘Michelia’ and the Magnolia, subgenus ‘Yulania’, were considerably more related to each other than either one of them was to ‘Magnolia’ or other subgenus of ‘Magnolia’.

Since relationships are usually reflected by nomenclature, it was an undesirable situation to have species names in ‘Michelia’ and ‘Magnolia’, subgenus ‘Yulania’. Taxonomy provided three possible solutions to this problem.

The first was to join ‘Yulania’ and ‘Michelia’ species in a common genus, separate from the ‘Magnolia’ genus where the term ‘Michelia’ would be given the priority.

The second would leave the subgenus ‘Magnolia’ names and the ‘Micheila’ names untouched by raising the subgenus ‘Yulaina’ to generic rank.

The third solution was to create a “big genus” by joining genus ‘Magnolia’ with ‘Michelia into genus ‘Magnolia, sI’. Since it includes ‘M. virginiana’, (the type species of the genus and the of the family), Mangnolia subgenus ‘Magnolia’ cannot be renamed.

Excluding their wood, only a few ‘Michelia’ species’ have any economic or horticultural importance so far. On the other hand, many species within subgenus ‘Magnolia’ and subgenus ‘Yulania’ very horticulturally important, to the point that many people in the horticultural discipline would consider it to be undesirable to change their name.

Since most of the cultivated species in Europe have at least one of their parents being ‘Mangnolia (Yulania) denudata’, ‘Yulania’ is considered to be synonymous with ‘Magnolia’ on the continent.

The third option to join ‘Michelia’ with ‘Magnolia’ is supported by most taxonomists as they acknowledge the close the close relations between ‘Michelia’ and ‘Yulania’.

The same applies for the ‘Dugandiodendron’ and the (former) genra ‘Taluama’ which were also placed in genus ‘Manglietia’ and subgenus ‘Magnolia’. ‘Manglietia’ could actually be joined with subgenus ‘Magnolia’ but could also be considered for earning the status of an extra subgenus.

‘Elmerrillia’ is more than likely to be handled in the same was a ‘Michelia’ is now because it is closely related to ‘Michelia’ and ‘Yulania’.

The exact nomenclatural status remains uncertain for non-specific or small genera such as ‘Aromadendron’, ‘Alcimandra’, and ‘Parakmeria’. These non-specific or small genera are often merged into ‘Magnolia sI’ by taxonomists who did the same with ‘Mechelia’.

There is a perpetual debate between botanists as whether to recognise the different small genera or simply recognise just a big ‘magnolia’. An example of this debate can be found between the Chinese and the western co-author of “Flora of China”. The book puts two points of view across. The first being that there is a large genus ‘Magnolia; that includes around 300 species which is favoured by the western author. The second is that there are 16 different genera and each of those contain up to 50 species. The second argument is put forward by the Chinese.

Subdivisions of Magnolias

Following the classification conducted by the Magnolia Society, species of Magnolias are usually listed under 3 subgenera, 12 sections and 13 subsections. However, this is not the last word in regards to genus ‘Magnolia’ and it’s sub-classification as a clear consensus has not yet been achieved.

PURPLE MAGNOLIA FLOWERS IN NATURE

Uses

Horticultural Uses

There has been a lot of general horticultural interest for the genus ‘Magnolia’. Many flower early in the spring such as the tree called ‘M. x soulangeana’ also known as the Saucer Magnolia and the shrub called ‘M. stellata’ also known as star magnolia. There are also others that flower as late as early summer such as ‘M. grandiflora’ which is often referred to as ‘Southern Magnolia’, and the ‘M. virginiana’ which is also known as ‘Sweetbay Magnolia’.

There have been efforts made to create plants that have a more impressive flower and that are able flower earlier on than the parent species by attempting to combine the best aspects of different species. Such efforts have been extremely successful thanks to the use of Hybridisation. A popular example of a successful hybrid would be that of ‘M. liliiflora’ and ‘M. denudata’ which created ‘M. x soulangeana’ (one of the most popular garden magnolias).

Pairfum Londn Magnolia

In the eastern United States, ‘M. grandiflora’, ‘M. macrophylia’, ‘M. acuminate’ (in the form of a Shade Tree), ‘M. tripetala’, and ‘M. virginiana’ are five native species that are cultivated frequently. However, it is worth noting hat ‘M. tripetala’ and ‘M. macrophylia’ have large leaves which means they must be planted in a location not frequented by high winds.

PINK MAGNOLIA FLOWER BUDS

Culinary Uses of Magnolia

With many species of Magnolias, their flowers are edible and are used in cooking all around the world.

The petals of ‘M. Grandiflora’ can be used as a spicy condiment when they are pickled. This is common in some parts of England.

On the other side of the world in Asia, the buds are used rather than the petals to be pickled and then used to scent tea and flavour rice. The flower buds and young leaves of ‘Magnolia hypoleuca’ are eaten as a vegetable in Japan after they are boiled.

Japan have also found further uses by creating cooking dishes and even wrapping their food in the leaves of ‘M. Obovata’.

PINK MAGNOLIA FLOWER AGAINST THE SKY

Magnolias in Traditional Medicine

In traditional Chinese medicine, they have long been using the flower buds and even the bark of ‘M. officinalis’ which they refer to as ‘hou po’ (厚朴). In Japan, they also do something similar with ‘M. obovata’ which they call kōboku.

Timber

In forests in the north east of the United States, ‘M. acuminata’ (The Cucumber Tree) is harvested as timber since it grows to a very large size. The wood of the Cucumber Tree is sold as “yellow poplar” alongside the Tuliptree (‘Liriodendron tulipifera’).

On occasion, the ‘M. fraseri’ (The Fraser Magnolia) grows to be large enough to be harvested as well.

Other Uses of Magnolias

As well as humans, Magnolias are also consumed by Giant Leopard Moth and other Lepidoptera species as food plants.

Magnolias in Home Fragrance

If you are lucky enough this weekend to spot a blooming Magnolia, then stop to take a look, and inhale their intoxicating fragrance.

To experience Magnolia, you should really try our perfume “Magnolias in Bloom” in our Home Fragrance range. Visit our online boutique to find the product that would enjoy most.

Photo Gallery of Magnolias